Toronto Laboratory for Social Neuroscience

 

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

Michael

Michael Inzlicht, Professor of Psychology


Lab Manager

Phone: 416-208-4868 Email

Phone: 416-208-4868
Email

Veerpal Bambrah obtained her Honours Bachelor of Science in Mental Health Studies and Women's and Gender Studies at the University of Toronto, Scarborough Campus. She is currently managing Michael Inzlicht's Toronto Laboratory for Social Neuroscience and Yoel Inbar's Emotion, Morality, and Politics Laboratory. Her independent study with Inzlicht examined the role of trait mindfulness in the emotional disengagement of attention, using the emotional attentional blink task. She has a growing interest in the use of event-related potentials (ERPs) using electroencephalography (EEG), and hopes to apply these methods to further examine the role of mindfulness, self-control, and emotion regulation in social, and possibly clinical, behaviours.


Postdoctoral Fellows

Sponsor: Michael Inzlicht Phone: 416-208-4868 Email  

Sponsor: Michael Inzlicht
Phone: 416-208-4868
Email
 

Daniel Randles's current work focuses on understanding why there are individual differences in self-control and whether targeted training can change a person’s tendency to exhibit greater daily control for longer periods (months). Self-control is still an active topic of research and discussion, with no one theory accounting for current data or fully explaining why individual differences might exist. Daniel uses social neuroscience techniques to study self-control at the individual level, and machine learning analyses to estimate patterns of control across regions of North America, based on accessible online digital footprints. Additional lines of research that Daniel is interested in include the cognitive process and behavioural consequences of uncertainty, and the effects of different emotions, particularly shame, when experiencing life-changing events.


Sponsor: Michael Inzlicht Phone: 416-208-4868 Fax: 416-287-7642 Email Website

Sponsor: Michael Inzlicht
Phone: 416-208-4868
Fax: 416-287-7642
Email
Website

Blair Saunders’ research focuses on the dynamic relationship between emotion and self-control. Emotions can have either detrimental or beneficial influences on self-control, depending critically upon the context in which emotion arises, or the relevancy of such affect to goal-directed behaviour. In one line of his research, Blair investigates the instrumental role of negative affect in the initiation of self-control after unexpected challenges to performance, such as response conflict or errors. A second aspect of Blair’s research concerns the impact of goal-irrelevant emotion as a potent source of environmental distraction during effortful performance. Finally, Blair is interested in the role of personality, disposition, and mood states in determining whether negative affect is met with the adaptive up-regulation of control, or catastrophic over-reactions that ultimately have deleterious consequences for on-going behaviour. In pursuit of these research goals, Blair uses both reaction time analyses and electroencephalography (e.g., ERPs) to study the impact of event history on the behavioural and neurophysiological correlates of self-regulation.


Graduate Students

Advisor: Liz Page-Gould Phone: 416-208-4868 Email

Advisor: Liz Page-Gould
Phone: 416-208-4868
Email

Chad Danyluck is interested in the factors that potentiate harmony between members of different social groups. Current lines of research examine: (1) how perceptions of similarity and conflict affect interest in cross-group friendship, (2) how money and money beliefs influence intergroup relations, and (3) the mechanisms through which meditation influences a more positive intergroup contact experience. Chad’s methodological approach is multi-faceted, incorporating self-report, behavioural, psychophysiological and neuroscientific instrumentation as well as dyadic experimental designs. Chad is currently conducting an outside project under the guidance of Michael Inzlicht.


Advisor: Michael Inzlicht Phone: 416-208-4868 Email

Advisor: Michael Inzlicht
Phone: 416-208-4868
Email

Nathaniel Elkins-Brown’s research explores the involvement of rapid and transient emotions in self-control, self-regulation, and performance-monitoring. Broadly, he tries to understand how moment-to-moment affect facilitates and impedes controlled processes, and how it may be possible to direct this affect in ways that let us cultivate self-control. In one line of research, Nat studies how affective information from task errors and response conflicts impact various control processes, such as error awareness and behavioural adjustments. In a second line of research, he investigates how different strategies for regulating these rapid emotions—such as mindfulness meditation—may bring about their salutary effects on self-control and health. In pursuit of these research goals, Nat makes use of a wide variety of methods, such as reaction time analyses, experience sampling, facial electromyography (EMG), and electroencephalography (e.g., ERPs).


Advisor: Randal McIntosh Phone: 416-208-4868 Email

Advisor: Randal McIntosh
Phone: 416-208-4868
Email

John Eusebio graduated from Western University with an H.BA in Psychology, specializing in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience. His primary research interest involves the initiation of cognitive control, and the formation of functional networks to facilitate task performance under varying levels of cognitive load. His research has also expanded into non-conscious areas, such as resting state temporal dynamics, mindfulness, and mind-wandering. John is also interested in neuroplasticity and the role of resting state networks in exploring the brain’s dynamic repertoire.


Advisors: Michael Inzlicht & Zindel Segal Phone: 416-208-4826 Email

Advisors: Michael Inzlicht & Zindel Segal
Phone: 416-208-4826
Email

Amanda Ferguson is interested mindfulness, and the ways in which mindfulness-based therapies can influence emotion regulation and self-control. She's especially curious about the practice of acceptance - what makes an individual more or less likely to accept a state of negative emotion? Which mechanisms are involved, and how are they activated during mindfulness-based practices? Amanda is excited to study these questions throughout her graduate degree.


Advisor: Michael Inzlicht Phone: 416-208-4868 Email

Advisor: Michael Inzlicht
Phone: 416-208-4868
Email

Zoe Francis’ research looks at self-control, mental fatigue, and personal beliefs. She is particularly interested in examining and improving the methodologies used to study these areas—for example, how to harness repeated-measures designs to study ego depletion—as well as investigating relevant individual differences. Broadly, she aims to use both behavioural and neurophysiological methods to discover underlying processes behind everyday actions and to ultimately understand why people's actions and motivations are so diverse.


Advisor: Michael Inzlicht Phone: 416-208-4868 Email

Advisor: Michael Inzlicht
Phone: 416-208-4868
Email

Nick Hobson’s primary research interests centre on meaning-making systems, specifically religiosity and its various epistemic and sociocultural drives. A current line of research investigates the effects of synchronized ritual on prosocial and altruistic tendencies using both behavioural and neurophysiological measures (e.g., EEG). Nick is also interested in the cultural transmission and adaptive function of the unique sets of beliefs that underlie various religious ideologies. In working toward such endeavours, he hopes to engage in both proximal and ultimate approaches in order to create a more consilient research framework.


Advisor: Michael Inzlicht Phone: 416-208-4826 Email

Advisor: Michael Inzlicht
Phone: 416-208-4826
Email

Hause Lin is exploring how we make decisions. Sometimes making decisions feels effortless; other times, we struggle to decide—so how do we choose and decide when faced with multiple options? Are there neural correlates of decision conflict and uncertainty, and can these correlates tell us anything about how and when our brains choose to choose? Hause hopes to use a multi-method approach to study decision-making processes.


THESIS STUDENTS

Hodan Artan
Flavia Freitas Melcop Cardozo
Jeyasakthi Venugopal
Zahra Khan


Volunteer Research Assistants

Abdul Joya
Angela Wang
Deepika Elango
Jacqueline Conway
Jane Cao
Krishna Patel
Luxana Ramesh
Michelle Minkovich
Samidha Vishway
Yilin Hong
Wana Sakhi


Work-Study Students

Abiraa Karalasingam
Flavia Freitas Melcop Cardozo
Sushmit Durjoy
Zahra Khan


Lab Alumni

Timour Al-Khindi (M.D./Ph.D. student, Johns Hopkins University)
Belle Derks (professor, Utrecht University, the Netherlands)
Marie Good (assistant professor, Redeemer University College)
Jennifer Gutsell (assistant professor, Brandeis University)
Jacob Hirsh (assistant professor, University of Toronto, Rotman Business School)
Sonia Kang (assistant professor, University of Toronto Mississauga, Rotman Business School)
Lisa Legault (assistant professor, Clarkson University)
Marina Milyavskaya (assistant professor, Carleton University)
Vincent Pillaud (assistant professor, University of Caen, Normandy, France)
Jessica Remedios (assistant professor, Tufts University)
Achala Rodrigo (Ph.D. student, University of Toronto)
Rimma Teper (quantitative consultant, Style Couture)
Shona Tritt (clinical psychologist)
Alexa Tullett (assistant professor, University of Alabama)